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Laboratory presentation

Welcome to the CSC laboratory!

"CSC" is the short name of the laboratory. CSC stands for Cell and Stem Cell laboratory for CNS disease modelling.

The laboratory is also referred to as the iPSC laboratory for CNS disease modelling, since induced pluripotent stem cells is the cell type we use in our research.


Latest news

more news, click here

- New study published in PNAS, by Carla Azevedo and colleagues (click here)

first page of PNAS article

- New study published in Cell Reports, by Kaspar Russ and colleagues (click here)

snapshot of the cover page showing graphic abstract and study summary

 


Research strategy

 

Research in the laboratory attempts to define pathogenic cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in synucleiopathies, in particular Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy, and Alzheimer's disease. To this aim, we generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from patients, which we utilize to understand cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous processes that lead to neuronal damage.

By generating iPSCs from patients suffering familial and idiopathic forms of the diseases, we aim to elucidate causative mechanisms leading to neural cell dysfunction, and neurodegeneration.

Our cutting-edge approach will allow for the identification of new molecular targets, which could be used for the development of new diagnostic tools for early diagnosis, as well as for the stratification and recruitment of patients for future clinical trials.

 

iPSC cycle photo

Photos

alpha-synuclein aggregates in human astrocytes

photo gallery

photo paterning

photo oligodendrocytes

photo astrocytes

EB stained Yuriy

photo hippocampus